Home Improvement Contractor / Handyman Services

Why do you need to test for radon?

The EPA recommends that you know what the indoor radon level is in any home you are considering buying.

This guide recommends short-term testing for real estate transactions.


The EPA also recommends testing a home in the lowest level which is currently suitable for occupancy, since a buyer may choose to live in a lower area of the home than that used by the seller.

Radon has been found in homes all over the U.S.

Radon is a radioactive gas that has been found in homes all over the United States. It comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water, and gets into the air you breathe. Radon typically moves up through the ground to the air above, and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Radon can also enter your home through well water. Your home can trap radon inside.

Any home can have a radon problem, including new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements. In fact, you and your family are most likely to get your greatest radiation exposure at home. That is where you spend most of your time.

Nearly one out of every 15 homes in the United States is estimated to have an elevated radon level (4 pCi/L or more).

Elevated levels of radon gas have been found in homes in every county throughout New Jersey.

The EPA and the Surgeon General recommend that you test your home.

Testing is the only way to know if you and your family are at risk from radon.

The EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon.

You cannot predict radon levels based on state, local, or neighborhood radon measurements. Do not rely on radon test results taken in other homes in the neighborhood to estimate the radon level in your home. Homes which are next to each other can have different radon levels. Testing is the only way to find out what a home's radon level is.

Hire a qualified radon tester:

In many cases, home buyers and sellers may decide to have the radon test done by a qualified radon tester who knows the proper conditions, test devices, and guidelines for obtaining a reliable radon test result.


They can also:

  • evaluate the home and recommend a testing approach designed to make sure you get reliable results;
  • explain how proper conditions can be maintained during the radon test;
  • emphasize to occupants of a home that a reliable test result depends on their cooperation. Interference with, or disturbance of, the test or closed-house conditions will invalidate the test result;
  • analyze the data and report measurement results; and
  • provide an independent test.

Contact us today to schedule your Radon Test.

If elevated levels are found during the real estate transaction, the buyer and seller should discuss the timing and costs of the radon reduction. The cost of making repairs to reduce radon levels depends on how your home was built and other factors. Most homes can be fixed for about the same cost as other common home repairs, such as painting or having a new hot water heater installed. The average cost for a contractor to lower radon levels in a home can range from $800 to about $2,500.


New Jersey Certified Radon Measurement Technician

MET#14169


Schedule a Radon Test